Exploring the curious corners of campus

Exploring the curious corners of campus


Bovey Greenhouses and Garden

Karen K. Tran

Among the collection of tropical plants at the Bovey Greenhouses is a living wall of orchids. In the winter, the orchids are usually at their peak bloom.

Karen K. Tran

It’s humid inside the greenhouses all year round. This provides comfortable conditions for temperate plants such as the coffee plant, which is native to tropical climates.

Karen K. Tran

Right outside the greenhouses is the Bovey Garden, a teaching garden where many flower hybrids are planted, such as the Blue Eyed Beauty.

Honey Bee Research Centre

Karen K. Tran

The local honey provided across campus at most hospitality services locations comes from the Honey Bee Research Centre, where they conduct research on honey bee health. Before moving to its current location, Townsend House, the facility was located where the University Centre is.

Karen K. Tran

Beekeeper Stephanie Otto uses a smoker while opening up the hives to protect herself from getting stung. The smoke makes the guard bees hungry and go inside for a snack, leaving the hive undefended.

Karen K. Tran

The University of Guelph has been conducting apiculture research since 1894. Today, there are over 300 beehives on location and a number of honey bee breeding stations on two islands in Lake Simcoe.

Guelph Observatory

Karen K. Tran

On the roof of the MacNaughton building is the observatory. Students in U of G’s astronomy classes and members of the astronomy club visit a few times each semester to take a look at celestial objects like the moon, Saturn, or Jupiter through the telescope.

Karen K. Tran

Tours of the observatory are open to the public and available in the spring, fall, and winter.

Karen K. Tran

From time to time, there are special events held at the observatory for viewing celestial events, such as the partial solar eclipse on August 21.

Hagen Aqualab

Karen K. Tran

A variety of marine animals are housed at the Hagen Aqualab research facility such as these skates, a relative of rays.

Karen K. Tran

Skates lay eggs in these casings known as a mermaid’s purse.

Karen K. Tran

These nocturnal bamboo sharks, commonly known as cat sharks for the whisker-like sensory organs on their faces, are kept in covered tanks to keep them in the dark.

CFRU 93.3 FM

Karen K. Tran

In the CFRU recording studio on the second floor of the UC, Janan Shoja Doost records her weekly talk show, T.K.O., which discusses mixed martial arts and combat sports on the Campus and Community Radio in Guelph, CFRU 93.3 FM.

Karen K. Tran

On-air programmers have the choice to pre-record their show in the training or production studio, or they can opt to host their show live in the on-air studio. Shows broadcasted on CFRU range from talk radio to different genres of music to third language world content.

Karen K. Tran

The vast CD and vinyl archive features many local and underground artists.

Biodiversity Institute of Ontario

Karen K. Tran

Founded in 1863, the University of Guelph Insect Collection is the oldest collection of its kind in Canada and includes many rare and extirpated species. The collection continues to grow and contribute to the International Barcode of Life project.

Karen K. Tran

The Centre for Biodiversity Genomics (CBG) is the core facility where millions of plant and animal specimens have been DNA barcoded for taxonomic purposes. The ongoing International Barcode of Life project, started by U of G Professor Paul Hebert, is a public compilation of knowledge by researchers all over the world.

Karen K. Tran

Over 100,000 preserved specimens of local and international flora are archived at the BIO Herbarium, located on the second floor of the CBG.

Wild Ontario

Karen K. Tran

Birds of prey such as a red-tailed hawk, American kestrel, turkey vulture, peregrine falcon, great horned owl, and many other non-releasable individuals are part of the environmental education program Wild Ontario on the U of G campus.

Karen K. Tran

Puck is a female eastern screech owl who was found with Oberon, a male of the same species, when someone noticed that they looked injured on the side of a road. The two were on display at Science North in Sudbury for many years before joining Wild Ontario to continue educating the public about wildlife.

Karen K. Tran

Wild Ontario is run with the help of dozens of volunteers like Jenny Lin, who always feeds Mowat the barred owl a tasty treat when she visits him.

Photos by Karen K. Tran.

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